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    #1

    Default exam

    How does one not keep postponing studying for the exam?
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  3. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #2
    Make a training schedule. Stick to it. Book the exam date in advance of starting the training. Stick to it.
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    #3
    There's only one month for the exam, what should I study? I've read Todd Lammle's book and CCNA for dummies.
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    #4
    Have a look at the exam blueprint for what you should be covering. Then make sure you know each area as much as possible.
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    #5
    What do you do about the difficult topics? Should one be perfect on it?
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  7. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #6
    Personally, I aim to hit around 80-90% in practice exams before the real exam, so I feel confident enough. If you find particularly hard areas/topics, then you simply need to spend more time learning, whether that's reading, labs, flashcards, exam questions or anything else relevant.
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    #7
    look for packet tracer labs. there are some out there already pre-made with config objectives geared around the exam topics. Those were really helpful to me when I took it.
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    #8
    What is a tftp host in Cisco IOS?
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    #9
    You blatantly ain't ready if you have to ask questions like this
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  11. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by wonder[riya7 View Post
    What is a tftp host in Cisco IOS?
    I'd have to echo Welly. If you're having trouble with TFTP and Cisco IOS, then I would suggest perhaps engaging a training class rather than a book. It sounds as if most (if not all?) of your training is based on theory/book knowledge? Have you actually worked in the area you're about to try and certify in?

    Oh, and TFTP is Trivial File Transfer Protocol; the host being the end of the connection that allows a client to get or put a file to/from it. Cisco IOS is probably one of the most widely used and known network infrastructure software. Pretty fundamental for the certification, I would have thought. I haven't even started studying for my network stuff and I've already had experience with both.
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    #11
    I havent worked in networking, but I passed N+ 6 yrs back. Is CCNA more difficult than N+?
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  13. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #12
    I would say you're going to find it very difficult if you're not using what you're learning. It can be done, but expect to put in the time. CCNA I would say is above N+, yes. Also, 6 years without using a certification will often mean you're almost back where you started.
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    #13
    I finished the third book which is Todd Lammle's second study guide. I finished the multiple choice also. Should I refer the practice exams?
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    #14
    The practice exam would at least tell you where you are roughly.
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    #15

    Default practice test

    I scored 6/10 in the practice test on this link
    Cisco CCNA exam: Are you ready? Take this 10-question quiz to find out
    but I am not understanding Q 6 at all. The first part of the quiz all right but the second part all wrong. I am not able to figure out EIGRP load balancing at all in Q6. Do you know how?
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  17. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #16
    Do you mean question 5? It's the only question I see with EIGRP as an option.

    Anyway, the answer to that would be the directly connected interface, because the administrative distance is the smallest. The smaller the AD, the higher the preference. Static routes have an AD of 1, while the EIGRP has an AD of 90 and OSPF an AD of 110.
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    #17
    Not Q5, I got stuck on Q6. The one which says "In the network diagram above, which path will packets take when travellig from host 192.168.50.126 to host 192.168.50.5" They said "We begin by identifying to which network host 192.168.50.126 belongs. IP address 192.168.50.126 is the last usable address for network 192.168.50.64/26, which means it is directly connected to router 3.Next, we need to identify where 192.168.50.5 is located. By examining the diagram, we can see IP 192.168.50.5 is router 1's interface that connects directly with router 2.
    Finally, to understand the path packets will take, we examine the output of router 3's routing table and discover that there are two equal cost links to network 192.168.50.4/30, therefore EIGRP will load-balance between both paths."
    But they didnt give the costs. Then how to load balance without costs?
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  19. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #18
    You misread the answer. It doesn't matter what the cost is, they already stated the costs are equal. That's all you need to know. If one cost is not bigger than the other, it will load balance both points.
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    #19
    But where do they state the costs are equal? They just give a routing table but where are the costs given?
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  21. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #20
    It's the [part in square brackets].
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    #21
    What is the second number in square brackets? The first is AD. And how do we find where the specific computer is because they have given only the full network with subnet mask.
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  23. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #22
    The first number is the AD. The second is the metric. And you can find where the relevant IPs are based on the information given with the subnets.
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    #23
    Thanks. And how do we find where the specific computer is because they have given only the full network with subnet mask.
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  25. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #24
    The classless subnetting enables you to figure out the IP ranges. I'm not sure how else to tell you. If you're given a network and subnet, you can figure out exactly how many IPs and which IPs are in the range.

    It might be worth looking to other training, as it seems you're having trouble with some quite fundamental stuff for a CCNA exam. Have you considered classroom or live online training courses?
    Desktop: MCSE: Mobility | Server: MTA | Cloud: None | Networking: MTA
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    #25
    I went for weekend classes in Trainocate. I went with my brother who is also writing the exam.
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