View Poll Results: What is the hardest topic to study for CCNA?

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  • Bridging/Switching

    396 6.97%
  • 7-layer OSI Model

    422 7.43%
  • Routed Protocols (IP)

    150 2.64%
  • Routing Protocol (RIP, IGRP etc.)

    685 12.06%
  • WAN Protocols (Frame Relay, ISDN, PPP, etc.)

    2,427 42.72%
  • LAN Technologies

    106 1.87%
  • Basic Router Management and Configuration

    282 4.96%
  • Access Lists

    1,213 21.35%
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  1. Member
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    #26
    For me ACL's are the worst. I won't take the test (again) until I get it down.

    As for subneting - subneting isn't difficult once you get it. But for the test you have to be quick. I think that if you are at the point were it doesn't come automatically (you should be able to do it in your head) you are going to run into trouble on the test time wise.
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  3. Junior Member weekend's Avatar
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    #27
    For me I think it's WAN protocol
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  4. Junior Member
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    #28

    Default WAN

    WAN seems to be the hardest to grab for me aswell.
    Im in a Cisco academy class atm taking the final chapter tests in 2 days.
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  5. Senior Member kadshah's Avatar
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    #29

    Default What's the hardest for me?

    I finaly mastered sunnetting Clas B & C but i ocassionally make mistakes
    with Class A. I get so frustrated from having read Todd's explanation on
    subnetting Class A for the 10th time and still not getting it. Drives me to drink.
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  6. Member
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    #30
    Why is subnetting absent from the list??
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  7. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #31
    It can be considered part of Router protocols (IP), but you are right, it should have been in the list as a separate topic.
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  8. Junior Member
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    #32

    Default subnetting

    SUBNETTING is easily the most difficult part of the CCNA. Router config is just the fun part of the CCNA. Knowing the protocols is almost like knowing your IRQ's and DMA's for the A+, it's not complicated. I voted for Access Lists since subnetting wasn't an option. Access Lists are a pain to maintain and configure, not exactly difficult
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  9. Member
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    #33
    For some reason subnetting and access-list came natural to me. I used Todd Lammle's CCNA Deluxe Edition chapter on subnetting to learn it. The way I learned it was by subnetting class C addresses for a week straight and writing every little detail on paper. The way I started was by subneting a class C 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.192. Subnetting is hard to learn but very much worth it when you do. My biggest problem with the 640-801 is ISDN. I know what a NT1 is and R reference point stuff like that, I'm just failing to see the big picture. I'm taking the exam this coming Monday and my nightmare is seening an ISDN simulator on the exam.
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  10. Senior Member evanderburg's Avatar
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    #34
    I think subnetting is the hardest, especially since the guides say you must be able to do it in 60 seconds. Since subnetting was not an option, I chose WAN technologies.
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  11. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #35
    I should have added Subnetting as an option indeed. But if you think subnetting is the hardest part, you are not sufficiently prepared for the CCNA. It's a 'basic' skill when it comes to IP networks and routing.

    the guides say you must be able to do it in 60 seconds
    Those guides are correct. And if you practiced enough, it should be very doable. There's only a fairly limited number of possible subnet masks and corresponding values (number of subnets and hosts), which you can memorize if you don't want to calculate them over and over again.
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  12. Junior Member
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    #36
    How about the simulations. I have failed 2 times so far and neither time I have been able to get the simulation working. The first time I got an 800 and the 2nd time a 737. I am going to take it again at the end of this month and don't know what I can do to beef up for the simulation section.
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  13. Member
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    #37
    I think WAN protocol is tough because we have to memorize lot of things and ACL is hard to understand.
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  14. Senior Member evanderburg's Avatar
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    #38
    The number of hosts and subnets does not give me trouble. It is when I try to find which hosts are on the same network or which addresses are usable. I am still taking a bit too long. Math was never my strong point. I make simple mistakes when I am under time pressure.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by AceAll
    I think WAN protocol is tough because we have to memorize lot of things and ACL is hard to understand.
    True, but you definetely cant understand ACLs if you dont have a good grasp on subnetting.
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  16. Senior Member kadshah's Avatar
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    #40
    just curious why was subnetting left out?
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  17. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #41
    Quote Originally Posted by kadshah
    just curious why was subnetting left out?
    Because subnetting is part of the Routed Protocols option, it's an integrated topic of IP addressing. The poll options are based on the previous CCNA exam (640-607), but still appropriate for the new CCNA exams though.
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  18. Senior Member kadshah's Avatar
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    #42
    heh! just noticed my question was already asked by someone else.
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  19. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #43
    heh! just noticed I answered that question before.
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  20. Junior Member
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    #44
    I think WAN protocols are hard because outside of a simulator it's hard to get hands on experience with them. Sure you can get a DTE/DCE cable between two routers but they won't do frame relay or ISDN. At least I haven't figured out how to do that with a serial interface. That and ISDN drives me insane with all the interface types and switch types.

    As for subnetting I found a great book on the internet that did wonders for me. I can practically do them in my head now because of it.

    THe book is called "Neural Technologies Corp IP Subnetting guide"
    and in spite of its rather homebrew looks I found it invaluable.

    Its at this link..

    http://nntek.com/ip.htm

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  21. Junior Member
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    #45
    Is NAT rolled into the access lists section of your sample questions or is it a separate part?
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  22. Senior Member
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    #46
    do you have three routers? if you do then you can configure frame relay using DTE/DCE cables, you just need one router to be a frame relay switch.

    You can also do it with two routers, but then you wouldn't have anything to "relay" back and forth , or would you?

    2lbs.
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  23. Junior Member
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    #47
    I got some help from "ed_the_lad" to do it with two. THat's what I have to work with and one of them is a 1005 with IOS 11.3 which is as high as it can go with its hardware config. So there's some limitations there but the 2611 makes for a great FR switch.

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  24. Member
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    #48
    In my opinion its ISDN technologies and configurations. The rest of the CCNA is straight forward.
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  25. Senior Member
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    #49
    Subnetting is like "snatching the pebble," Grasshopper. I worked on it for weeks and I just couldn't get it and then one day, I woke up and you couldn't give a subnetting problem I couldn't do. I was an expert. Of course, I never have to figure it out in my head in real life, so I have forgotten it all again.

    I think routing protocols were the hardest for me to learn at the time I was studying, but I understand them fairly well now.
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  26. Junior Member
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    #50
    man the access-lists are something i understand but i still can't perfectly implement them
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