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  1. Member
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    #1

    Default When do you bring the salary question

    Hi,
    I been noticing most of the jobs are now listed without salary and sometimes HR rep does your phone interview and still doesnt ask you what are you salary expectations.
    I recently had a phone interview like that and now i am called in for in person interview, however i still dont know if it aligns with my salary expectations and by asking the question i dont want to come off as greedy.

    At what point do you guys bring the salary question (if not already brought by the hiring rep). Phone interview? 1st interview or not until you get the offer.
    I feel waiting until you go through the interviews to know they cant afford you is just waste of everyones time.
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  3. Senior Member shochan's Avatar
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    #2
    I always give them a salary range that I will agree upon, if they want to continue the conversation then great...if not, it usually ends.
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    #3
    I always ask for a range during the initial communication. No sense in wasting a PTO day to go in and find out they are offering 20K below your minimum requirements. They should value their time as much as you value yours.
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    #4
    Usually the very first conversation I'll discuss at least a ball park range. No point in going through multiple interviews wasting everyone's time if you aren't even close.
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    #5
    Here's an even better question, when you give your salary, and you know it's within their salary range because position is a "graded" job that the ranges are publicly posted, and they tell you "that's on the high side" what do you do in that case? Continue or move on?
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    #6
    I talk about it early on because I want to save myself and them time...
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  8. Little Teapot LeBroke's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Squished View Post
    Here's an even better question, when you give your salary, and you know it's within their salary range because position is a "graded" job that the ranges are publicly posted, and they tell you "that's on the high side" what do you do in that case? Continue or move on?
    I think in that case you'd have to evaluate how much you want to work there... if it's a public position with publicly posted ranges, chances are it's a government (or similar) position, so benefits are probably really good.
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  9. Senior Member
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by LeBroke View Post
    I think in that case you'd have to evaluate how much you want to work there... if it's a public position with publicly posted ranges, chances are it's a government (or similar) position, so benefits are probably really good.
    Benefits are absurd. Hah!
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    #9
    There's that career advice from multiple people on the Internet who claim to be experts on this, to delay the salary negotiation using various tricks to the latest stage possible. The main argument is the later the stage the more expensive it is for the company to dump you, therefore, you get the leverage in negotiation.

    I'm pretty high in both position and salary range on this market and I can tell that this never worked for me so I consider this advice BS. I tried it and it just leads to wasted time.

    I have plenty of pings from recruiters almost everyday and to minimize time wasted I bluntly go to the salary question first or just don't reply/pick up as almost all good jobs come with a pay tag right away. If it's out of range -- it's the end of conversation.

    Maybe it's worth to use this advice on early stages of your career, who knows.
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  11. Little Teapot LeBroke's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by gespenstern View Post
    There's that career advice from multiple people on the Internet who claim to be experts on this, to delay the salary negotiation using various tricks to the latest stage possible. The main argument is the later the stage the more expensive it is for the company to dump you, therefore, you get the leverage in negotiation.

    I'm pretty high in both position and salary range on this market and I can tell that this never worked for me so I consider this advice BS. I tried it and it just leads to wasted time.

    I have plenty of pings from recruiters almost everyday and to minimize time wasted I bluntly go to the salary question first or just don't reply/pick up as almost all good jobs come with a pay tag right away. If it's out of range -- it's the end of conversation.

    Maybe it's worth to use this advice on early stages of your career, who knows.
    This has honestly been my experience as well.

    If the company really likes you and you're arguing over maybe 5k, you might be able to get it.

    But if you're asking for 20k more than the company is willing to pay, they won't budge unless they're really, really flexible, and you've really, really impressed them to the point they offer you a more senior job. But if they're trying to hire you at 20k below market, very good chance they're cheap or don't have the money to offer you market salary, so this is a very unlikely scenario.

    Better to know right away than waste hours of your life interviewing, especially if there's a direct, measurable cost to you (drive far away, use your PTO, etc).
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